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Presentations

As GIS applications permeate our social workspace, an increasing number of public issues affect, and are affected by, what we do. GIS professionals have specific expertise that can inform important public policy, and we are also impacted by public policies propounded by others. Let’s review several examples with the intention of getting more involved in the issues we know and care about: ྲྲ

  • Assuring access to our governments’ geospatial data
  • Calculating ROI for GIS data to account the benefits of geospatial applications 
  • Monitoring legal definitions of the professional boundary defining the work of Surveyors and GIS Professionals
  • Using the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) for geodetic control of geodatabase themes
  • Responding to proposed Federal legislation that concerns mapping agencies’ procurement policies
  • Balancing divergent concerns about the use of sUAS (drones) for mapping
  • Preserving GPS infrastructure
  • Advocating for Addresses to become the eighth FGDC Framework Theme
 

The mission of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is "to define, maintain and provide access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) to meet our nation's economic, social, and environmental needs." NSRS is the nation's system of latitude, longitude, elevation, and related geophysical and geodetic models/tools, which provides a consistent spatial reference system for a broad spectrum of users and applications, including GIS, surveying and other geosciences.  Technological developments -- notably Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and related technologies -- and user accuracy requirements have necessitated that NGS undertake efforts to modernize and improve the NSRS.  Preparations are underway for a major NSRS makeover, to be completed in 2022 through a new generation of horizontal and vertical datums, featuring unprecedented accuracy and access efficiency.  

This presentation will outline the status and planned evolution of NSRS, including the definition and delivery of a new geometric datum, realized through GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), to replace the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83).  Designed to complement the new geometric datum, a new vertical/geopotential datum -- based on a national gravimetric geoid and replacing the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88) -- will be developed and co-released.  The conditions necessitating these new datums and recommendations for the eventual user transition to them will be reviewed.

 

Who, What, and Where is the Arizona Trail Association and the Arizona National Scenic Trail?  A tour of results from the over twenty years from the Arizona Trail Association, which promoted and completed the 800-mile long Arizona Trail. Now a National Scenic Trail, See how the Arizona Trail Association has used GPS, GIS, and other data from hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours over the years to provide everything thing from a website full of information linked to interactive mapping, to official guidebooks, and several types of navigational aides all to better your experience with the Arizona National Scenic Trail.

 

This presentation was part of the Arizona Tribal Community Track.

This track is structured and organized by and for the Arizona GIS Tribal Community. There are presentations that focus on what tribes are doing, how they might better learn and leverage each other’s expertise, what has worked well and what has not, potential resources, and how the tribes can benefit from working with each other and the Arizona GIS Community.

 

This presentation was part of the Arizona Tribal Community Track.

This track is structured and organized by and for the Arizona GIS Tribal Community. There are presentations that focus on what tribes are doing, how they might better learn and leverage each other’s expertise, what has worked well and what has not, potential resources, and how the tribes can benefit from working with each other and the Arizona GIS Community.

This presentation will discuss how the Gila River Indian Community established a physical addressing system using multiple addressing systems to locate physical structures. We will also discuss how the value of physical addressing is being expressed to Community members through the use of Community Outreach.

 

This presentation was part of the Arizona Tribal Community Track.

This track is structured and organized by and for the Arizona GIS Tribal Community. There are presentations that focus on what tribes are doing, how they might better learn and leverage each other’s expertise, what has worked well and what has not, potential resources, and how the tribes can benefit from working with each other and the Arizona GIS Community.

 

This presentation was part of the Arizona Tribal Community Track.

This track is structured and organized by and for the Arizona GIS Tribal Community. There are presentations that focus on what tribes are doing, how they might better learn and leverage each other’s expertise, what has worked well and what has not, potential resources, and how the tribes can benefit from working with each other and the Arizona GIS Community.

This presentation will discuss how the Gila River Indian Community finds and trains individuals for unpaid internships. These internships are structured to provide valuable experience and knowledge in all aspects of GIS.

 

This presentation was part of the Arizona Tribal Community Track.

This track is structured and organized by and for the Arizona GIS Tribal Community. There are presentations that focus on what tribes are doing, how they might better learn and leverage each other’s expertise, what has worked well and what has not, potential resources, and how the tribes can benefit from working with each other and the Arizona GIS Community.

Esri’s Data Driven Pages is an excellent means to build sustainable exhibits and mapbooks. This presentation discusses setting up a project with Data Driven Pages, lessons learned and project samples: Allotment, Emergency Plans, BIA Road exhibits and Community Atlas.

 

This presentation was part of the Arizona Tribal Community Track.

This track is structured and organized by and for the Arizona GIS Tribal Community. There are presentations that focus on what tribes are doing, how they might better learn and leverage each other’s expertise, what has worked well and what has not, potential resources, and how the tribes can benefit from working with each other and the Arizona GIS Community.

Versioning is a recommended environment for updates in a multi-user database. This presentation will discuss what Versioning is, some of the workings behind the scenes and how it’s used at Ak-Chin Indian Community. Advanced database experience is not necessary for understanding and using Versioning, but this presentation assumes that an SDE database is already in place.

 
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We will demonstrate a couple of methods to effectively improve your use of AZGEO (the state clearinghouse). Efficiencies of automated upload and download of datasets through the use of Feature Manipulation Engine (FME) server will be described. AZGEO Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) through the use of FME will make it easier and in some cases seamless to serve your customers and use the latest GIS datasets available.

 
 

Last year the University of Arizona Libraries investigated various solutions for developing a geospatial data portal to consolidate the multiple disparate repositories at the University into one accessible and modern geospatial web interface.  An inventory was completed, interviews were conducted with relevant campus stakeholders and geospatial data portal managers at various academic libraries, and various options for geospatial data portals were investigated.  

This year we are implementing Open Geoportal for the University of Arizona. It is a collaboratively developed, open source, federated web application for discovering, previewing, and retrieving geospatial data from multiple repositories. Leveraging GeoServer, Solr, OpenLayers, and number of other applications, libraries, and toolkits, the Open GeoPortal application allows for any institution to implement a robust, intuitive, and economically viable means to share and access geospatial data.    During this presentation we will go through our reasoning for choosing Open GeoPortal, the application technology, the development and migration processes, and the issues and problems encountered throughout the implementation of the portal.

 

The process of moving from providing paper maps for internal customers to providing an online, self-service, GIS application can be a daunting one. Fortunately, we found ourselves facing this challenge in an era when there are numerous paths, tools, and approaches to achieve the intended goal. Using a combination of software selection and project management tools, with limited resources, over a two-year period, we were able to achieve that goal. Challenges we faced included (but were not limited to); GIS software selection, standards and data management, enterprise integration, architecting for the future, designing and building a data model, and planning for large data sources like LiDAR. We hope that our experience can help guide others as they consider similar challenges.

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Software companies typically introduce more and more features into their products over time in an effort to improve and extend their attractiveness to an increased number of users. In all-too many cases however, the process of “improvement” comes at the expense of compromising the software’s core functionality. Commercial GIS software is not immune to this failing. In an effort to be all things to all users, proprietary GIS software is becoming a lowestcommon-denominator solution in all aspects of its functionality.

This presentation discusses the phenomena of GIS bloatware, and an open-source alternative approach that focuses on best of breed “singularity functionality”: webpage components that optimally perform specific spatial processing functions and communicate through a common API.

 

Addressing point features are vital components of any mature GIS, but what is being done to track the sub-address for all those features such as buildings and units?  See how sub-addresses are be used to track buildings and units that are associated with a single address.  A single address can have many combinations of buildings and units representing multiple one to many relationships in the GIS.  In this presentation we'll see how GIS is used to place building and units features and relate them to a single addresses.  How to create building and unit feature classes from non-spatial tables and relate them to an address for editing in the GIS.  How to work with and place units within multi-story buildings.  Assignment of unique ID's for addresses, buildings, and units and assemble of a sub-address table for use in business systems.

 

The use of GIS data and products continues to grow and will continue to do so as additional professions further integrate geospatial data and products into new applications. More and more government operations rely on GIS inputs and/or applications to support their customer services. The general public is continually exposed to location-based products through mainstream offerings such as Google Maps, GPS location and routing applications, and Open Data initiatives. As this growth continues, the potential for misinterpretation and/or misuse of GIS data and products increases. GIS professionals have a responsibility to ensure that end-users of their data and products have a clear understanding of what they are getting and limitations on what they use it for. This presentation will review guidelines that have been developed to date, discuss their effectiveness and overall use, and explore future directions that can be worked towards by GIS professionals to help decrease the potential for misuse.

The following items will be included for review and discussion --

  • GIS metadata standards that provide data/product quality indicators.
  • A standard disclaimer as a "heads-up € regarding GIS product use.
  • Options for conveying GIS data and products that can help to prevent misuse.
  • Case studies detailing how implementation of the above can achieve our goals.
  • Cooperative outreach efforts to further educate GIS data/product end-users.
 

This presentation will explore the issues involved in both sharing data through and accessing data from central GIS warehouse systems such as AZGEO Clearinghouse. Through demonstrations, users will be shown how transformation technology can be used to manipulate data to meet the structural requirements of practically any GIS data repository and a broad range of other applications including ArcGIS, CAD programs, Excel, databases, and more. Attendees will walk away with an understanding of how to contribute data from practically any source to GIS warehouses and conversely access it for use in their preferred environment.

 

Its a new world of BYOD (bring your own device) we are seeing in the work place today. This coupled with a desire to take data with greater detail and easier to design forms into the field, has taken over consumer devices (tablets and phones). But we cannot sacrifice the ruggedness and accuracy we have become accustomed to from our other proprietary make and models.  More than just showing our location on the right side of the street, we need to record the location within specifications and be able to navigate to and verify again, days, weeks or even months later.   These solutions are available today for iOS, Android, and typical Windows devices. See how we are using Bluetooth to pair with an external GNSS (single and dual frequency) to provide various sub-meter accuracies for data collection.   This easy to use, easy to learn work flow will even appeal to your tech-adverse colleagues.   Along with the details of how it is accomplished you will see real life examples of successful projects.   Learn how to optimize your consumer device and what pitfalls to avoid in your quest for greater accuracy from your tablet or phone.

 

ADOT Information Technology Group (ITG) has been diligently working to centralize data and its access with the expectations of reducing the complexity of the current application base.  As many of the existing applications have lacked an interface to any GIS use, the need for GIS analysis and output products has become increasingly a priority for existing and future applications.  With this requirement, ADOT ITG is working towards a GIS application development/enhancement environment that:

  1. Is built on sound programming principles and modern technology,  
  2. Incorporates Agency development patterns and security,  
  3. Provides for easy re-use/recycling of code, and  
  4. Provides consistent products that are still responsive to the user's needs.
 

At the Tucson Police Department, part of our strategy in the deployment of assets and resources is guided by mapping and spatial analysis.  For example, one of the projects we utilize as a management tool is the relational mapping of traffic stop and traffic accident hot spots. We do this using the hot spot analysis tool, Getis-Ord Gi*, to identify statistically significant hot spot traffic accident locations.  Once identified, we deploy resources to these areas for traffic enforcement purposes.  This is a continuous process, where we monitor activity and results spatially, and re-deploy resources accordingly.  In doing this we are able to use data-driven analysis to effectively reduce traffic accidents within our community.  This presentation will discuss the reasons we use this tool over other hot spot analysis tools, and how to use it, step by step, to obtain meaningful results.

 

Nonmedical Misuse/Abuse (NMA) of prescription drugs (RX) has become a public health epidemic throughout the United States (US). The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 45,000 people die annually from RX overdose.  Arizona is not immune to the epidemic and as of 2013 has the 10th highest drug overdose mortality rate in the US, with 18.7 per 100,000 people dying.    In 2014, the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) was awarded a grant from the US Justice Department to implement the Arizona Prescription Drug Misuse and Abuse Initiative (AZRXMAI) in Maricopa County (MC).  Within MC, ACJC has been working with Mercy Maricopa Integrated Care and the Maricopa County Department of Public Health (MCDPH) to support a multi-pronged approach to reduce NMA of RX in MC communities.  Within the AZRXMAI, MCDPH has been focused on gathering data regarding NMA of drugs resulting in fatal overdoses.  

The Office of Epidemiology within MCDPH is utilizing GIS to find areas within the county that have the highest number of deaths, which will help stakeholders improve and prioritize prevention and treatment efforts.   The purpose of our analysis is to identify hot spots and patterns for fatal drug overdoses in MC by zip code from 2008-2013.  Fatal drug overdoses in this study were limited to Heroin, Cocaine, Opiate, and Benzodiazepine, since these are the most commonly abused/misused drugs.  In this presentation, we will discuss how year-to-year overdose trends correlate with cumulative trends from 2008-2013. We will also discuss demographic characteristics of prescription drug overdoses.

 

The Flood Control District of Maricopa County operates 313 rain gages throughout the county.  These gages provide near real time rainfall data for use by meteorologists, hydrologists and other professionals.  Since many of these gages have been in continuous operation since 1980, the district sought a way for the public to view and analyze the historic data collected by these gages over the past 35 years.  The solution utilizes the friendly user interface and visualization tools of Google Maps and leverages the powerful spatial analysis capabilities of ArcGIS to make these data available to everyone via the Internet.  

 

The purpose of Low-Distortion Projections (LDPs) is to minimize the difference between projected (grid) distances and the actual ground distances.  But it can be difficult to design LDPs that perform satisfactorily for large areas of variable topographic relief -- or even to know whether the resulting design is optimal.  This presentation demonstrates an automated method for design of LDPs that ensures optimal performance in such situations.  The presentation also covers details of creating metadata to accompany the LDP design.  Because regardless of how well an LDP performs, it is by and large useless without complete and correct documentation.

 
 
 
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